Spotlight on the Suicides: The Coroner

November, 1, 2019 | 13 Comments

Comments

  1. Why did they even bother, with the Expert, one asks oneself?

    From where we sit, it looks like a Done Deal and this sort of Done Deal happens much too often when a patient has died from a severe reaction to Sertraline or Seroxat, SSRIs..

    I can hardly imagine how frustrating this must have been, but, then again, I can imagine…taking a few Paroxetine tablets can bring on the same result from these pills; it has been recorded, it has been transcripted, cases have gone to US court rooms – where they listened to the Expert..

    As you say, Coroners know nothing about psychotropic medications, and akathisia, and even less about possible drug interactions.

    But, the point is, no-one listened to Stephen, and the next Doctor Post will be revealing.

    The Coroner does his job, mostly, seemingly, from the evidence given to him, but, as you and I know, this is completely biased information – the Coroner was not there when Stephen gave his own diagnosis.

    He gave it to everyone, apart from the Coroner.

    Once again, no one is listening, not to Stephen who died, not to the Expert.

    They hear what they want to hear, they do what they want to do, and they have absolutely no intention of thinking out of the box or being able to take on board vital data and evidence which could mean that Stephen was strangled by his drug..

    ​​Going through the formalities …

  2. Threads which need pulling out for me include; would they have been crass enough to want to get a ‘case’ of a person’s suicide off the table before going on holiday? (Housekeeping)
    Who compiled the transcript and was s/he, administrator/clerk told to hold it back or withhold if a request for it was made while they were away, or any other time.
    It seems when they went into the huddle the family doctor was persuaded to agree a script which was the bigged up in court ‘to be used as a model’. If that ‘model is used to influence others there can be serious consequences on other incidents.Who drew that up? It seems like a joint effort by the members of the huddle with no record of the discussion and a nervous family doctor taking the stand afterwards possibly after being reassured of support for what they had decided should be stated in court. Most of us are experienced enough to know how ‘looks’ can be used in different ways.

    The most astonishing thing is that they had an expert in both pharmacology and psychiatry on hand but excluded David H and his evidence relying it seems on what they could get away with using particular elements from the FDA reports. A bunch of non experts couldn’t possibly grasp the knowledge required about the mix or even one of these drugs even in a few hours of the huddle. Were they using the time to undermine David H and who made the comment that he ‘has an agenda’. How much did that influence others which surely should lead to a retrial with a different unbiased set of people? And an investigation of what took place.
    This evidence is what a professional such as David has expert knowledge of
    Is it any wonder people kill themselves when so many potential adverse effects from not just one but a whole bundle of drugs with potential harms are used without due care.

  3. It is shudderingly awful how much mis-information is passed around in court-rooms…

    Murdered by Sertraline?

    Posted on July 5, 2013 by Brian — 4 Comments ↓

    ‘by forgetting his tablets for two days then taking a triple dose on the day before the killing’

    This is information that an expert would surely be familiar with..

    http://antidepaware.co.uk/murdered-by-sertraline/

    Update (April 2015)

    The Court of Appeal dismissed Paul’s appeal on April 29th 2015.

    At the appeal, Mr Martin-Sperry criticised the misleading testimony of Professor David Taylor at the original trial. He said that the issue of the potential of Sertraline to induce violence was not explored properly at the trial and that more research should have been done to see if Sertraline could cause violent outbursts in rare cases.

    He had, however, been refused permission by the Court of Appeal to call a psychiatrist to testify to this fact.

    Dismissing the appeal, Lady Justice Hallett (left) said that any such evidence would not have been enough and that Paul would have had to convince jurors that the drug’s effects had in fact triggered his outburst when he killed his mother. She decided that there was nothing wrong with the way his trial was conducted and that his conviction was “safe”.

    (By this time, information had emerged that James Holmes had been prescribed Sertraline before he shot dead 12 members of a cinema audience in Aurora, Colorado)
     
    * Sadly, Dr Herxheimer passed away in February 2016, aged 90.

  4. Oh how I admire people who dare to fight for themselves or their relatives.

    But in the light of how utterly ‘bonkers’ politicians and scholars act in my beloved Sweden, I’ve just given up.

    I’ve even started to think the ‘socialism’ I was brought up to believe in, is the very thing that prevents me from believing things can change concerning pharmaceuticals.

    We give the pharmaceutical companies all the benefits of doubt, while we sit back and socialisticly think “-Oh but they mean well….they don’t want to hurt people”

    When infact the cold truth could be the very opposite.

    Some facts that are hard to deny: a patient that eats one pill each day of his life, is worth more to them than a healthy person. Either they want to help the patient, or they want to give a pill to the healthy one.
    Ove2019

  5. Neglectful at best to keep adding pills to a guy who clearly could have been suffering from Serotonin Syndrome. Hard to read this for so many reasons.

  6. Some of the info for professionals cant be copied and pasted, looks like due to to plagiarism concerns, but can still be read online

    Drugs A to Z Buspirone Interactions

    Buspirone Drug Interactions
    OverviewSide EffectsDosageProfessionalTipsInteractionsMore
    Drug Interactions (414) Alcohol/Food Interactions (1) Disease Interactions (5)
    Currently displaying a list of 414 drugs known to interact with buspirone.

    85 major drug interactions
    327 moderate drug interactions
    2 minor drug interactions
    Return to the most common drugs checked in combination with this medicine.
    Price Guide buspirone

    Buspirone Prices, Coupons and Patient Assistance Programs
    Buspirone is a member of the miscellaneous anxiolytics, sedatives and hypnotics drug class and is commonly used for Anxiety, Borderline Personality Disorder, Panic Disorder and others.

    Buspirone Prices
    This buspirone price guide is based on using the Drugs.com discount card which is accepted at most U.S. pharmacies. The cost for buspirone oral tablet 5 mg is around $14 for a supply of 100 tablets, depending on the pharmacy you visit. Prices are for cash paying customers only and are not valid with insurance plans.

    Oral Tablet
    5 mg
    buspirone oral tablet
    from $13.57
    for 100 tablet
    7.5 mg
    buspirone oral tablet
    from $85.86
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    10 mg
    buspirone oral tablet
    from $15.83
    for 100 tablet
    Quantity Per unit Price
    90 $0.25 $22.15
    100 $0.16 – $0.37 $15.83 – $37.34
    500 $0.08 – $0.30 $39.22 – $148.71
    1000 $0.29 $287.91
    Important: When there is a range of pricing, consumers should normally expect to pay the lower price. However, due to stock shortages and other unknown variables we cannot provide any guarantee.

    15 mg
    buspirone oral tablet
    from $14.96
    for 60 tablet
    30 mg
    buspirone oral tablet
    from $117.08
    for 60 tablet
    Drugs.com Printable Discount Card
    The free Drugs.com Discount Card works like a coupon and can save you up to 80% or more off the cost of prescription medicines, over-the-counter drugs and pet prescriptions.

    Please note: This is a drug discount program, not an insurance plan. Valid at all major chains including Walgreens, CVS Pharmacy, Target, WalMart Pharmacy, Duane Reade and 65,000 pharmacies nationwide.

    Buspirone Coupons and Rebates
    Buspirone offers may be in the form of a printable coupon, rebate, savings card, trial offer, or free samples. Some offers may be printed right from a website, others require registration, completing a questionnaire, or obtaining a sample from the doctor’s office.

    There are currently no Manufacturer Promotions that we know about for this drug.

    Patient Assistance Programs for Buspirone
    Patient assistance programs (PAPs) are usually sponsored by pharmaceutical companies and provide free or discounted medicines to low income or uninsured and under-insured people who meet specific guidelines. Eligibility requirements vary for each program.

    There are currently no Patient Assistance Programs that we know about for this drug.

  7. Drugs.com

    For more info look under the ‘professionals’ header – not allowed to copy and paste

    Drugs A to Z Mirtazapine Side Effects
    Print Share
    Mirtazapine Side Effects
    Medically reviewed by Drugs.com. Last updated on Dec 22, 2018.

    OverviewSide EffectsDosageProfessionalTipsInteractionsMore
    Consumer Professional Managing Side Effects
    In Summary
    Commonly reported side effects of mirtazapine include: severe sedation, constipation, drowsiness, increased serum cholesterol, weight gain, fatigue, insomnia, increased appetite, xerostomia, and decreased appetite. Other side effects include: dizziness, increased serum triglycerides, tremor, dyspepsia, hot flash, palpitations, vertigo, abnormal dreams, bitter taste, decreased libido, and diaphoresis. See below for a comprehensive list of adverse effects.

    For the Consumer
    Applies to mirtazapine: oral tablet, oral tablet disintegrating

    Warning
    Oral route (Tablet; Tablet, Disintegrating)

    Antidepressants increased the risk of suicidal thinking and behavior in children, adolescents, and young adults with major depressive disorder and other psychiatric disorders in short-term studies. Short-term studies did not show an increase in the risk of suicidality with antidepressants compared with placebo in adults beyond age 24, and there was a reduction in risk with antidepressants compared with placebo in adults aged 65 or older. This risk must be balanced with the clinical need. Monitor patients closely for clinical worsening, suicidality, or unusual changes in behavior. Families and caregivers should be advised of the need for close observation and communication with the prescriber. Mirtazapine is not approved for use in pediatric patients.

    Along with its needed effects, mirtazapine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

    Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur while taking mirtazapine:

    Less common

    Decreased or increased movement
    mood or mental changes, including abnormal thinking, agitation, anxiety, confusion, and feelings of not caring
    shortness of breath
    skin rash
    swelling
    Rare

    Change in menstrual cycle (periods)
    convulsions (seizures)
    decreased sexual ability
    menstrual pain
    mood or mental changes, including anger, feelings of being outside the body, hallucinations (seeing, hearing, or feeling things that are not there), mood swings, and unusual excitement
    mouth sores
    sore throat, chills, or fever

    Some side effects of mirtazapine may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

    More common

    Constipation
    dizziness
    drowsiness
    dry mouth
    increased appetite
    weight gain
    Less common

    Abdominal or stomach pain
    abnormal dreams
    back pain
    dizziness or fainting when getting up suddenly from a lying or sitting position
    increased need to urinate
    increased sensitivity to touch
    increased thirst
    low blood pressure
    muscle pain
    nausea
    sense of constant movement of self or surroundings
    trembling or shaking
    vomiting
    weakness

    Drugs.com
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    Price Guide mirtazapine
    Print Share
    Mirtazapine Prices, Coupons and Patient Assistance Programs
    Mirtazapine is a member of the tetracyclic antidepressants drug class and is commonly used for Anxiety, Depression, Hot Flashes, and others.

    Brand names for mirtazapine include Remeron, and Remeron SolTab.

    Mirtazapine Prices
    This mirtazapine price guide is based on using the Drugs.com discount card which is accepted at most U.S. pharmacies. The cost for mirtazapine oral tablet 7.5 mg is around $65 for a supply of 30 tablets, depending on the pharmacy you visit. Prices are for cash paying customers only and are not valid with insurance plans.

    Oral Tablet
    7.5 mg
    mirtazapine oral tablet
    from $64.80
    for 30 tablet
    15 mg
    mirtazapine oral tablet
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    30 mg
    mirtazapine oral tablet
    from $43.04
    for 30 tablet
    Quantity Per unit Price
    30 $1.43 $43.04
    45 $1.33 $59.81
    100 $1.00 – $1.21 $99.63 – $121.30
    500 $1.14 $568.48
    1000 $1.13 $1,127.46
    See brand name versions of this drug:
    Remeron

    Important: When there is a range of pricing, consumers should normally expect to pay the lower price. However, due to stock shortages and other unknown variables we cannot provide any guarantee.

    45 mg
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    from $63.79
    for 30 tablet, disintegrating
    Drugs.com Printable Discount Card
    The free Drugs.com Discount Card works like a coupon and can save you up to 80% or more off the cost of prescription medicines, over-the-counter drugs and pet prescriptions.

    Please note: This is a drug discount program, not an insurance plan. Valid at all major chains including Walgreens, CVS Pharmacy, Target, WalMart Pharmacy, Duane Reade and 65,000 pharmacies nationwide.

    Mirtazapine Coupons and Rebates
    Mirtazapine offers may be in the form of a printable coupon, rebate, savings card, trial offer, or free samples. Some offers may be printed right from a website, others require registration, completing a questionnaire, or obtaining a sample from the doctor’s office.

    There are currently no Manufacturer Promotions that we know about for this drug.

    Patient Assistance Programs for Mirtazapine
    Patient assistance programs (PAPs) are usually sponsored by pharmaceutical companies and provide free or discounted medicines to low income or uninsured and under-insured people who meet specific guidelines. Eligibility requirements vary for each program.

    There are currently no Patient Assistance Programs that we know about for this drug.

  8. According to the complaint, Pfizer engaged in a practice known as publication bias, in which only clinical trials that achieve positive results (i.e., the drug outperforms the placebo) are published in medical journals. This practice makes it virtually impossible for physicians and consumers to reach an informed decision about a drug’s actual effectiveness, and exposes them to side effects and risks associated with these medications.

    https://www.baumhedlundlaw.com/consumer-class-actions/zoloft-class-action-claims-drug-company-misled-consumers-about-zolofts-ability-to-treat-depression/

    Dr. David Healy, a psychopharmacologist and professor at the University of Wales College of Medicine, and a colleague conducted an analysis of Zoloft articles that were “coordinated” by a medical communications company called Current Medical Direction (“CMD”).  Pfizer had hired CMD to promote Zoloft in the 1990’s. 

    Baum Hedlund first began litigating Zoloft cases against Pfizer in 1999 when it filed one of the first Zoloft suicide cases in the nation and then went on to represent dozens of families in Zoloft suicide and suicide attempt cases against Pfizer.

    Drug Seroquel caused AstraZeneca to pay fine of $520 million 28/4/2010

    https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=FDA+Quetiapine&view=detail&mid=F2DBABEB23CCF223FD50F2DBABEB23CCF223FD50&FORM=VIRE

  9. When is a Suicide not a Suicide?

    Posted on June 9, 2013 by Brian — No Comments ↓

    http://antidepaware.co.uk/when-is-a-suicide-not-a-suicide/

    It has been proposed that there should be a separate verdict for those who have taken their lives while under the influence of prescribed medication. This would be a verdict of “Iatrogenic Suicide”, the word iatrogenesis being defined as an inadvertent adverse effect or complication resulting from medical treatment or advice. This would be supported by those who are concerned that suicide figures are underestimated due to the number of self-inflicted deaths registered as open or narrative verdicts.

    Coroner’s Progress 1 (Ian Smith)

    Posted on February 26, 2013 by Brian — 1 Comment ↓

    http://antidepaware.co.uk/coroners-progress-vol-1/

    He said: “I have to say this is probably the fifth, if not sixth inquest I’ve heard within a period of three years when somebody either just going on to Citalopram or Seroxat, or coming off it, have killed themselves one way or another, totally out of the blue, totally without expectation, without a history of suicidal thoughts in the past.” 

    Mr. Smith went on to say that he had dealt with six to eight cases in a short period where people had taken their lives days after starting antidepressant drugs and he had reported these concerns to the health authorities despite coming under criticism for speaking out.

    Who was it who criticised Mr Smith for speaking out on an important issue?

    Who has the authority to interfere with the free speech of a coroner in his/her own court?

    Was Mr Smith the only coroner to be admonished, or were other coroners warned in case they should make similar observations?

    Wherever the criticism came from, it seems to have been heeded.

    …there is a need for “openness, transparency and candour throughout the system“.

    It is evident that this should also apply to the Coronial System.

  10. In 2004, Millie Kieve, founder of the APRIL Charity, called the Manchester Coroner’s office

    Millie recorded the conversation with the Manchester Coroner’s office and tells them of her struggles …

    https://fiddaman.blogspot.com/2019/11/louis-appleby-knew-about-prescription.html#.XcLuVpr7Rdg

    Listen to the 14-minute phone conversation here

    https://www.april.org.uk/media/

    A day in the APRIL charity office and Millie calls the Manchester Coroner’s office as there has been a Roaccutane suicide. Millie is concerned about the reaction of Professor Louis Appleby and why he ommists to warn about medicines causing Akathisia and suicide risk for some people. She wants to know if the MHRA have written to Coroners to warn of the ban on prescribing antidepressants to under 18’s. Also mentioned are Dianette and Lariam.

    https://twitter.com/APRIL_charity

    Also; he, is ‘willing to write to all the corners’ … just to tell other coroners about it …

  11. Millie and the Tsar

    Posted on November 9, 2019 by Brian — 1 Comment ↓

    http://antidepaware.co.uk/millie-and-the-tsar/

    If the NCISH is capable of acquiring such detailed and personal information about children who have taken their lives, then it is certainly able to establish which psychotropic drugs, if any, they had been taking at the time. However, since its inception in 1996, this area of research has been omitted.

    “Serious concerns about the overprescription of antidepressants such as Seroxat and Prozac will be spelled out by the two bodies regulating the safety and use of medicines in Britain. They will advise that for people with mild to moderate depression, or with moderate anxiety, they may be better off seeking other treatment such as therapy or even daily exercise.”

    Meanwhile, at the age of 79, the indomitable Millie Kieve made her debut at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe in August this year, telling the story of the Cruise to Hell (below), in which she relived the tragedy of her daughter’s medication-induced death in 1995.

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