RxISK Prize

September, 12, 2017 | 5 Comments

Comments

  1. Congratulations on a fantastic idea – and a brave step forward. I sincerely hope that you will be successful in the attempt to solve this puzzle. Who knows, maybe the answer to many of the other problems associated with these drugs will be solved – or at least be better understood – as a result of this too.
    Are you going public with this news? By that, I mean are you contacting the general media to explain the answers you are looking for? Wouldn’t it be a good chance to share with the public the good work already being done by RxISK and the willingness to share the fact that there are still questions to which RxISK does not have the answers?
    I sometimes feel that the message of Rxisk needs a push out into the light. Yes, I know, it’s there online for all to find – and, probably, has helped very many by being there. However, I feel that it is mainly being found by those already suffering and looking for answers. Surely, in the long run, the message needs to reach those who have no need to go looking for it, so that the numbers who suffer will be lessened?

  2. Mick Bramham faces Sex and SSRIs and includes a Study in Iran which contains many links to Studies on PSSD which may help as a starter to support this critical research for those desperately overwhelmed, or, underwhelmed, as the case may be .. a powerful writer for this tragedy …

    Mick Bramham is an Existential Psychotherapist based in Dorset, UK. He has a particular interest in ethical issues and also in how our lives are shaped by the society, circumstances and culture in which we live.

    Post-SSRI Sexual Dysfunction (PSSD)

    There is however another trauma that some people are experiencing. It is not the result of war but rather from a battle with depression. These people are also victims and there are those who are not keen for it to be recognised for what it really is. Alas, their suffering continues. It is the damage caused by the SSRI antidepressants: I am specifically thinking of Post-SSRI Sexual Dysfunction (PSSD). PSSD has been referred to as a “stress syndrome” (details here) – such is the impact on the body’s physiology.

    http://blog.mythsandrisks.info/2014/07/sex-and-ssris.html

    Study of effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on stages of sexual function in Iranian patients with major depressive disorder

    This study was carried out since little information on sexual dysfunction due to these medications is available in Iran

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3840807/

    Results:

    A total of 75% of patients reported sexual dysfunction: 66.7% of men and 79.7% of women. A total of 74.1% of patients on fluvoxamine, 100% on fluoxetine, 75% on sertraline, 71.4% on citalopram and 100% on paroxetine reported sexual dysfunction. The most frequent sexual dysfunction was difficulty with orgasm, which affected 41.17% of women and 33.33% of men.

    According to Prof David Healy, we are not necessarily talking about high doses over many years; notably, “PTESD can happen after very brief exposure to an SSRI or related drug (3 days)” – see here. Yes, you read that correctly, after just a few days use.

  3. Can we offer our own theories, based on research over time gleaned from various professionals from the disciplines listed above? Sometimes these people have slipped us bits of useful information but are afraid to be identified personally with it. Particularly those working in university research departments whose funding is dependant on Big Pharma. Oh, and would it be indiscreet to ask what the prize might be? And who are the judges? What a fabulous idea…….

    • Heather

      Any hints that might lead somewhere are welcome – some people find temporary benefit from lots of things such as sleep deprivation or cannabis and we have a list of some of these. Any others people can add would be great. The bits of information also sound useful. But could all comments be directed to RxISK where the main site is

      We have a panel of sufferers. The first criterion is that whoever has a treatment will need to persuade our panel to try it. The second is that the panelists have to agree it has solved the problem or made a substantial difference. This is not something people who do not have the problem can judge/

      David

  4. David

    Thanks for the explanation. Also, there is lots more detail about this Prize Launch over on Risk Blog, which I should have had the sense to check first. It’s such a cool idea, with so many advantages, can’t imagine why none of us ever thought of this before.

    Heather

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