The Story of SSRI Stories

February, 28, 2012 | 11 Comments


  1. Rosie, thank you for all that you’ve done. I’ve been in touch with Sara Bostock and perhaps you in the past – not sure. The website is so wonderful – it would be a shame if it is let go.

    Partly because of people like you, I made a decision to keep going in my small way speaking out against the ill effects of Zyprexa and the other atypical antipsychotics. Though I’ll never speak at an FDA hearing again (waste of time), I do plan to keep writing to officials and giving some interviews now and then. Some days, I’m encouraged, especially when I learn of efforts to change the way mental health care is provided in the U.S…..any move away from throwing drugs at an individual and towards really listening kindly and helping in other ways is positive.

  2. We are very sad to learn of Rosie’s illness. She is a remarkable & extremely corageous lady. Thank You for telling her story and giving her the recognition she deserves for her life-saving work with the SSRI stories website. She is a hero of ours.

    Our hearts are with Rosie & her family.

    Neil Carlin
    Oakville, ON

  3. Thanks so much for highlighting SSRI stories! I am saddened to read that Rosie is sick, please know I appreciate all of the hard work and dedication to the site that you did, Rosie. This made me think of ‘Furious Seasons’, and I am happy to see Ellen and Neil Carlin here in comments as well. Everyone, keep up the good fight for truth.


  4. I want to thank Rosie (and Sara) for her vision to create SSRI Stories. Their collection of individual stories has helped to tell a bigger story about these dangerous, mind-altering drugs. These are not anecdotal stories. Rather, they are real lives being affected (not some scientific data from a clinical trial). SSRI Stories also been a real gift to families showing that we are not alone.

    Rosie is in my thoughts and prayers. Thanks for being a warrior!!!

  5. At about 1:20 this morning, March 8, an angel came to our house. The angel tapped Rosie on the shoulder and said “Rosie, come with me. Jesus wants you to be with Him”. And with no hesitation, they both left.

    What a wonderful privilege it was for me to be in the room when God called one of his children home! And, what a wonderful thing for Rosie to leave her cancer and pain infected body here, and go off to where there is no pain.

    Her family and friends will miss her. But we can be sure she is waiting for us to join her.

    At Rosie’s request, the funeral will be private. Please do not send flowers. If you feel like you want to leave a memorial in her name, you may donate to the St. Vicent DePaul Society (Rosie’s favorite), or to any other charity that works primarily with the poor. Thank you for honoring this.

    Gene Meysenburg

  6. Thank you very much for posting the story of SSRIStories. I feel honored that I played a small role in enabling this work to reach the internet and make the impact that it did over the several years it has been up.

    After being on Rosie’s list serve for a few years in the early 2000s, I became very aware of the cumulative power of all the stories and was eager to bring this in some way to the web. This was also during the years that the FDA was holding open public hearings on antidepressants. My motivation to make it happen was the announcement in 2006 that there would be a hearing on young adults. I hired a young computer science student to create a “sortable” — not movable — database based on Gene Meysenburg’s prototype, purchased the web domain, funded a server, and we were off. My idea was to present the website at the FDA hearing in 2006 which I did. It generated quite a bit of interest and press at the hearing.

    My original intention was to help load stories as well and for awhile I did, but it was hard work and emotionally exhausting to read all the stories. I have great admiration for Rosie’s ongoing dedication over many years to continue to search for stories and load them into the database. There were many, many hits and e-mails coming in over the time she worked on it. I know she raised awareness over the years and the site is a fabulous resource. Most of the time she was working completely solo on all this, simply with words of encouragement from the rest of us.

    I will miss Rosie greatly. She was not only a co-worker for the cause, but a dear friend who gave me much support in my hours of grief over the loss of my beloved daughter to Paxil. I know she has been an inspiration and example to many of us and I am so glad to see her work evolve and contribute to sites such as David is creating now.


    Summary of Lori’s Story is now online!
    We were Decades in the Dark!

    I hope to find other families who are out there, who still are in the dark about Why they lost someone they loved due to concealed side effects of RX Drugs!

    Here is the link to Lori’s story 1956-1981

    If you want to join my group you can email me at: with your comments, and/or stories.

  8. In addition to my other post…I want to just add.. once I figured it all out, it was easy to piece it all together thanks to Ann Blake Tracy, and this ssri stories site!

    I have spoken with many people who had lost a loved one in this way..
    The only difference between Lori’s Story, and most of the others along the way is that they are linked to side effects of the ssri class of drugs., and dose not mention the class before it. TCA’s!

    I hope someday this site will also take in account that even the decades before the ssri’s came out..innocent people were losing their lives due to the concealed side effects of the TCA class of drugs!
    In my sister’s case it was Imipramine = used for situational anxiety (getting a divorce)

    I hope Lori’s Story will attract other stories to surface from the prior decades,
    These people should NOT BE FORGOTTEN just because they died so long ago, and mislabeled suicide. It was not their choice. It was RX INDUCED there is a difference. Thank you.

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